Last edited by Kagajin
Wednesday, July 29, 2020 | History

4 edition of Occupational Exposure to Silica and Cancer Risk (I a R C Scientific Publication) found in the catalog.

Occupational Exposure to Silica and Cancer Risk (I a R C Scientific Publication)

Occupational Exposure to Silica and Cancer Risk (I a R C Scientific Publication)

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  • 5 Currently reading

Published by IARC Scientific Publications .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Epidemiology & medical statistics,
  • Oncology,
  • Respiratory medicine,
  • Silica,
  • Forensic Medicine,
  • Industrial Health,
  • Medical / Nursing,
  • Health/Fitness,
  • Lungs,
  • Silicosis,
  • Cancer,
  • Carcinogenicity,
  • Epidemiology

  • Edition Notes

    ContributionsL. Simonato (Editor), A. C. Fletcher (Editor), R. Saracci (Editor), Terry L. Thomas (Editor)
    The Physical Object
    FormatPaperback
    Number of Pages131
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL9863897M
    ISBN 109283211979
    ISBN 109789283211976

      Abstract. Background Occupational exposure to silica dust occurs in many workplaces and is well known to cause silicosis. However, the link between silica exposure, silicosis and other diseases is still disputed. Aims To evaluate cause-specific mortality in a cohort of Italian silicotics.. Methods The cohort included male compensated for silicosis Cited by: Crystalline silica is a recognized carcinogen, but the association with lung cancer at lower levels of exposure has not been well characterized. This study investigated the relationship between occupational silica exposure and lung cancer and the combined effects of cigarette smoking and silica exposure on lung cancer risk.

    Inhaling silica dust can cause silicosis, a serious and irreversible lung disease. It can be lethal. Silica damages the lung and causes scar tissue to form. This causes the lung tissue to become thicker. Silica exposure can also cause lung cancer. It is possible to have silicosis without showing any symptoms at first. The longer workers have. Silicosis is a form of occupational lung disease caused by inhalation of crystalline silica dust. It is marked by inflammation and scarring in the form of nodular lesions in the upper lobes of the is a type of pneumoconiosis. Silicosis (particularly the acute form) is characterized by shortness of breath, cough, fever, and cyanosis (bluish skin). It may often be misdiagnosed as Other names: Miner's phthisis, Grinder's asthma, .

    Exposure to Silica and Other Contaminants in Construction. Silica is a common mineral found in many materials on construction sites, including soil, sand, concrete, masonry, rock, granite, and landscaping materials. 1 Disturbing these materials can create crystalline silica dust. 1 Workers who breathe in this dust are at increased risk of developing silicosis and other nonmalignant.   Wood dust is one of the oldest and one of the most common occupational exposures in the world. The present analyses examine the effect of lifetime exposure to wood dust in diverse occupational settings on lung cancer risk. We conducted two population-based case–control studies in Montreal: Study I (–) included cases and two sets of Cited by:


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Occupational Exposure to Silica and Cancer Risk (I a R C Scientific Publication) Download PDF EPUB FB2

Exposure of workers to respirable crystalline silica is associated with elevated rates of lung cancer. The strongest link between human lung cancer and exposure to respirable crystalline silica has been seen in studies of quarry and granite workers and workers involved in ceramic, pottery, refractory brick, and certain earth industries.

Although its association with lung cancer has been studied for many decades, the conclusion remains somewhat controversial. Our objectives are to review and summarize the epidemiological evidence on the relationship between occupational silica exposure and risk of lung cancer and to provide an update on this major occupational health by: COVID Resources.

Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle.

Occupational exposures during iron and steel founding cause cancer of the lung. No data on the carcinogenicity to experimental animals of mixtures present in iron and steel founding were available to the Working Group.

Occupational exposures during iron and steel founding are carcinogenic to humans (Group 1). Crystalline silica is considered as one of the most common and serious occupational hazards to workers’ health. Although its association with lung cancer has been studied for many decades, the conclusion remains somewhat controversial.

Our objectives are to review and summarize the epidemiological evidence on the relationship between occupational Cited by: Occupational Exposure to Silica and Lung Cancer: Pooled Analysis of Two Case-Control Studies in Montreal, Canada June Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention 19(6) relationship between occupational silica exposure and risk of lung cancer and to provide an update on this major occupational health concern.

Methods: Eligible studies up to 29 April were identified. Pooled effect estimates were calculated according to the reported outcome and the study by: NIOSH investigators sought a cohort of granite cutters exposed primarily to silica () in an effort to determine whether silica exposed humans were at an increased risk of lung cancer and whether those who have silicosis were at increased risk of lung cancer.

Lung Cancer. Exposure to respirable crystalline silica increases the risk of developing lung cancer. Lung cancer is a disease where abnormal cells grow uncontrollably into tumors, interfering with lung function.

The abnormal cancer cells can also travel ("metastasize") and cause damage to other parts of the body. Most cases are not curable. Occupational exposure to silica and lung cancer risk in the Netherlands Article in Occupational and environmental medicine 67(10) September.

Occupational exposure to chemicals, dusts, radiation, and certain industrial processes have been tied to occupational cancer. Exposure to cancer-causing chemicals (carcinogens) may cause mutations that allow cells to grow out of control, causing cancer.

The review indicates a significant risk of chronic silicosis for workers exposed to respirable crystalline silica over a working lifetime at the current Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) permissible exposure limit (PEL), the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) PEL, or the National Institute for Occupational Safety.

You are here: Home / Book and Report Series / IARC Scientific Publications / Occupational Exposure to Silica and Cancer Risk Occupational Exposure to Silica and Cancer Risk IARC Scientific Publication No.

It is well established that inhaled silica dust may produce fibrosis in the lungs. Inhaled silica has also been reported to induce cancer, but this association is not so well established. An excess of lung cancer in workers in iron ore mines, where silica is encountered in the atmosphere, was reported in but, since other agents are present in the dust, the excess is not necessarily.

Recent research also links laryngeal and sinonasal cancers with exposure to occupational carcinogens. Init was estimated that % of cancer cases in Australia could be attributed to workplace exposures (% in men, % in women).

ATLANTA Decem —A new review highlights new developments in understanding the health effects of silica, and calls for action to reduce illness and death from silica exposure at work, including stronger regulations, heightened awareness and prevention, and increased attention to early detection of silicosis and lung cancer using low dose CT.

crystalline silica which have been investigated in numerous epidemiological studies, almost all dealing with workplace exposures. The section mostly focuses on studies of lung cancer but also includes discussion of suggestive evidence that exposure to silica may increase the risk of esophageal cancer and possibly other Size: 2MB.

Occupational cancer is caused wholly or partly by exposure to a cancer causing agent (carcinogen) at work, or by a particular set of circumstances at work.

Cancer is not a single disease with a single cause or treatment. An increased risk of lung cancer has been demonstrated in several industries and occupations entailing exposure to PAHs, such as aluminum production, coal gasification, coke production, iron and steel founding, tar distillation, roofing, and chimney sweeping.

93 An increase has also been suggested in a few other industries, including shale oil. In particular, a population-based case–control study of occupational exposure to crystalline silica in male workers demonstrated a significant association between such exposure and gastric cancer incidence Another study of industrial workers showed a statistically significant correlation between exposure to silicon carbide and the risk of Cited by: 8.

Relation between silica exposure and risk of lung cancer: case-control studies. 1,2 1 Some of the studies in Table S2 are not present here because: (a) nested data from a cohort study already considered in Figure 1; (b) other data from the same case-control study are reported in Figure 2.

2 Reference category was no or low exposure to silica, according to the Cited by:   Objectives The lung cancer carcinogenicity of crystalline silica dust remains the subject of discussion.

Epidemiological evidence is based on occupational cohort studies and population-based case–control studies. The aim of this study was to assess associations between male lung cancer risk and silica exposure in a population-based cohort by: The likelihood of getting lung cancer from silica exposure follows a similar pattern, with a significant risk at levels around mg/m3 over many years, or .